Learn Creative Writing: Beginner’s Guide To Get Started With Creative Writing

creative writing guide

Encouraging children to write their own stories can greatly increase their confidence. Help them consolidate their literacy learning by using phonetics, grammar, and reading skills. One used to copy from the blackboard with voice guidance. The only concern is that there is not much time to write creatively. Furthermore, finding a creative writing guide becomes difficult.

 Your children can write stories at home, regardless of whether they are required to do so at school. Because most children sometimes have a seemingly natural urge to do so. This is just a beginner’s guide to the elements of starting creative writing and creative writing for your children. How you can support them and encourage them with a creative writing guide. Moreover, a more structured approach to story writing.

Get started with creative writing guide

Creative Writing Guide
Creative Writing Guide

1. Plot planning

First, ask your child where the story will take place. It can be a fictional or real place, it can be a planet, a country, a city, or a house, anywhere!

So when did this story happen, now? In the future? in the past?

Finally, ask them what they think will happen. Remember, this is not necessarily accurate, and you don’t have to be stubborn; many of the best writers say their plot unfolds organically as they write. However, if you have a clear idea about the direction of the plot, you can create an outline by completing the story plan, which can look like this:

  • First …
  • Then …
  • Next …
  • Finally …

2. Characterization

 Ask your child who will appear in the story. What do you want readers to think of each role? They may also want to jot down some thoughts. You can make a table for them to help organize their thoughts with these headings:

  • Character name
  • Relationship with other characters
  • Their appearance
  • Behavior

3. Story language

 Let your child come up with some good words to write his story. They can be long words or simple words, or they can be good descriptive words or words that help create rhythm and tension. Encourage them to write it down and refer to the checklist when writing the story.

4. Story Principle

 All writers know that you must grab the reader’s attention from the beginning; you want them to continue reading desperately. Let your child come up with some good beginning stories to let people know more. Here are some examples:

 Mysterious first phrase…

 Molly doesn’t know what day is next.

 The opening of a story using alliteration and other language skills…

 When Molly entered the house, the weather was humid, dark, and dusty.

 Creates nervous pressure Opening remarks…

 Molly can hear her heart beating faster than ever. Will this happen?

 Directly into the story of the dialogue…

 “But I don’t want to go to school, Mom,” Molly groaned.

 Encourage your child to read some books he likes to read and see how they start to inspire.

5. Write!

Once you have all these ideas, you can start writing. They can make a rough draft first, and then make a polished, polished version. They may want to write short chapters, use illustrations, or make their writing books; let them use their imagination and creativity when presenting them, and make sure to show how much you value the final product by rereading with other books in your home.

8 Elements Of Creative Writing

Creative Writing Elements
Creative Writing Elements

If you don’t understand how each component works, you can’t make a car engine, right …?

It is the same with writing.

These are the elements that make up creative writing and why each element is as important as the others:

1. Unique plot

 The biggest difference between creative writing and other forms of writing is that the former always has a certain plot and is unique. Without a plot, there is no story.

 There is no story, you just write facts on paper, like a reporter.

2. Character development

 Characters are necessary for creative writing. While you can certainly write a book creatively using a second-person perspective, you still have to develop characters to tell the story.

Character development can be defined as revealing who the characters are and how they change throughout the story. From start to finish, the reader should be able to fully understand your main character.

3. Potential topic

 Almost every story has a potential topic or message, even if the author does not necessarily intend to do so. But creative writing needs topics or information to be complete.

 That is part of the beauty of this art form. Through storytelling, you can also teach.

4. Visual description

 When you read a newspaper, you usually do not read descriptive paragraphs that describe the area around the event. Visual description is mainly used for creative writing.

 You need them to help readers understand what the environment around the character is like.

 Show don’t tell. Writing attracts readers and makes them imagine that they are in the place of paper; that’s why people read.

5. Views

 Several views can be written. That said, the two most common points of view in creative writing are the first person and the third person.

  • First-person: From this perspective, the narrator is the protagonist. This means that you will read the passage that includes “I” and understand that it is the protagonist of the narrative story.
  • The second person, in most cases, this view is not used for creative writing, but instructional writing, like this blog post. When you see the word “you” and the narrator speaks to you directly, this is a second-person view.
  • Third Person: There are a few different variants of this view. It has third-person restrictions, third-person multiplicity, and third-person omniscience. The first is what you usually find.
  • Imaginative Language

Part of what makes creative writing creative is the way you choose to shape the vision in your mind.

 This means that creative writing uses more anecdotes, metaphors, similes, figures of speech, and other figurative languages ​​to represent vivid images in the reader’s mind.

6. Emotional appeal

 All words can have emotional appeal. However, this is the goal of creative writing. As a writer, your job is to make people feel what you want them to do by telling them stories.

What do you learn in online creative writing classes?

  • Discover yourself and your way. In a creative writing course, you like where you should be. At that moment you know without a doubt that with the proper effort you can become a writer.
  • Find out your writing strengths. The best part of accepting criticism from your peers is that they tell you what you did right, which is comforting. When you know that your writing skills have a solid foundation, you are more likely to accept that you still have work to do.
  • Accept the weaknesses in your writing. No matter how good your writing is right now, there are things you can do to improve it. When your ten classmates agree that some elements of your prose need to be revised or you need to read a grammar book, all you can do is accept it and do your best.
  • Learn to deal with criticism of your work. Some of the initial comments may be a bit crude, but once you see all the suggestions on how to improve your writing, you will start to expect them. You will learn to separate yourself from your job, not only will you be able to deal with criticism, but you will also be able to accept it (and expect it). This will also prepare you for real-world critics and their reviews.

Podium School – Creative Writing

Creative writing is said to be natural, it cannot be learned or mastered. However, we dare to be different. Like any other skill, creative writing can be learned and mastered through hard work, dedication, and practice. Only. We offer excellent online courses for beginners and those who want to improve their writing skills for creative writing and functional writing skills.

kids who are above the age of 6 are eligible for our course. we provide 12 private lessons in this course that are once a week. Our teachers are really great at what they do and will provide the child a totally personalized experience.

By the end of this course, you will be able to write your own stories with interesting characters and plots based on real and imaginary settings. You will also be able to analyze the story plots and characters of the books that you read.

Session Wise Plan

Lesson 1: Introduction to writing

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty would cover topics like how to get started, the preparation required for writing, and the research that goes into creating stories and characters.

Lesson 2: Learn the power of observation to be a good writer

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty would make students run through memory lane on how to recount odd things that they can potentially notice and incorporate into their stories.

Assignment: The students will be asked to write one paragraph on something weird they noticed in their home, society, or school.

Lesson 3: Learn the power of observation to be a good writer

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty would make students run through memory lane on how to recount odd things that they can potentially notice and incorporate into their stories.

Assignment: The students will be asked to write one paragraph on something weird they noticed in their home, society, or school.

Lesson 4: Learn how to visualize a story

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty explain how to start writing thoughts into a story, visualizing your story first and then putting it on paper.

Assignment: The students will be taken through possible situations emerging out a hypothetical encounter (the start of a story), and will be assigned to complete the story as part of their assignment.

Lesson 5: Learn the advanced techniques of building a character

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty explain the nuances of creating mortal and immortal characters and explain how to create relatable characters for readers.

Lesson 6: Learn to identify the theme and genre of a book

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty would teach how to find the theme of the book that you are writing, how to define its genre and make a blueprint for the story of the book.

Lesson 7: Learn how to integrate storyline, theme and characters

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty would make you understand the finer aspects of picking and integrating a theme into a storyline or into character backstories.

Assignment: As part of their home assignment, they will be asked to create 1 different short story given the same set of constraints.

Lesson 8: Learn Ruskin’s style of writing children books

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty will cover topics like introduction to writing a book and staying relevant to the times, absorbing and writing about your surroundings.

Assignment: The children would have the assignment of analyzing a Ruskin’s book, series of books, or popular character from books they might have read.

Lesson 9: Learn how to write using easy words

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty focus on keeping the language easy to read and understandable for the reader, explaining the need for the simplicity of words.

Lesson 10: Learn how to overcome inertia to write

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty would focus on how to get over writer’s block, the importance of continuous reading for a writer, aligning your thoughts to the story, and reading techniques.

Lesson 11: Learn different writing styles

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty would talk about how to rewrite a story, different writing styles, writing for self, or writing for others.

Assignment: The children would have the assignment of analyzing a Ruskin’s book, series of books, or popular character from books they might have read.

Lesson 12: Learn the art of getting published

In this session, Ruskin and our Session Faculty would teach how to get your book published, sending the first draft to the publisher, being patient through disappointments and rejections, and never giving up.

Assignment: The students would be given the assignment to find about the top children’s books publishers in the country and share their thoughts on how to approach them.

FAQS

Q. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY CREATIVE WRITING SKILLS?

You can polish or begin with your creative writing skills by enrolling in an online creative writing course for you or your kids.

Q.WHO IS A CREATIVE WRITER?

A creative writer is one who creatively presents the story. Usually, they imply storytelling techniques to express and state his or her views. The main aim of the writer is to keep the readers, or the spectators, engaged and focused on the work.

Q.HOW DO I START WITH CREATIVE WRITING?

You can start with it right from your home! you can start grasping it by writing daily and keeping a check on your daily improvements and making sure you inculcate all the proper skills that are required to become a successful or a good creative writer, this can be done through various creative writing courses online or any other such things.

Get FREE Worksheets for your Child

Nursery to Grade 8. Math, English and Science Worksheets.

You can get all the existing worksheets together at Podium School App

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